The genre is one of my absolute favorites. Admittedly, I spend more time watching horror film and television than , but waiting in my cue is Lovecraft’s complete works. I guess he’s more surreal than horrific, but I cannot wait. I love that cross-over between fantasy and science.

A few summers back, I treated myself to reading Frankenstein. For some reason, Mary Shelley’s novel never came into my studies through undergrad. I needed to read this book! There was something weighing on my conscience as I was between , thinking of where I wanted to go next. I had been putting off a fantasy project for a long time.

Back in college, I used to sit in lectures and write my books. I could both listen and immerse myself in the work. It helped me retain the information better—talk about how odd some people learn. Right? At this particular time, I was interested in High Fantasy. Elves were, of course, my favorite things in the whole world. In later years, after setting the project aside to pursue my historical novel, I came to a hard decision. The advent of the Lord of the Rings films and a number of other works drove me further and further from High Fantasy. It wasn’t because I didn’t love it. I loved it and respected it, very much. in the genre, however, would have relegated me to the status of: Like Tolkien. I would never be original.

Originality is a smokescreen. Nothing is really original as it all pours out of the font of our cultural experiences. Whatever we take in simmers in the pot and something cooks up from those ingredients. If you look closely, you’ll be able to see what those ingredients are. Still, I was determined to write something that was unlike 90% of fantasy. This way, I could still enjoy reading the books and not fear copying ideas by accident. I mean, really, do you remember where all your ideas come from? (Start reading this paragraph over, if you don’t believe me.)

At this same time, I was interested in spirituality, metaphysics, occult and theology. I still may get a degree in these things, but for now, I am content with my degrees in film, writing and history. My collection of books on these topics grew in my 20s and 30s. I even started a book of shadows, all my own. If I were a practitioner of pagan pastimes, I’d be a solitary one. Groups tend to build around one individual wielding power and declaring how the rest will think about everything. That I cannot get behind, as a free thinker. Besides, I’m more interested in the cultural and historical aspects, rather than the literal proposal of religion. It is simply fascinating to learn how people have attempted to understand their world, death and birth, and all the oddities in between. Speaking of Oddities, I love that show! It’s exactly where my head is at with this topic—horrific and sublime.

Frankenstein was a similar narrative that dealt with these topics, embodying man’s faults and drives into a monster. Shelley bridged the gap between theology and science with horror. When I sat down to work, I first penned the screenplay, sewing together years of dreams and nightmares that, in hindsight, began to make a story. That screenplay is now three novels making up the Trailokya Trilogy.

Timing is often everything. I realize, looking back, that my undergraduate writings were necessary to plot out a basic story, which I would eventually amend to make into a more original series. Having not read Frankenstein until the point I was nearly ready, fed the information in my head of how I would go about doing that. Like Shelley, I bridged the gap between fantasy (in this case multiple human theologies) and science with horror. Perhaps my studies into the metaphysical have made me more prone to believing in timing, but I think the reason that Shelley’s book never crossed my reading list until so late had something to do with the creation of this project.

Just recently a study was done on the molecular level that showed the past is created out of the future. For something to have occurred, the end result has to appear in the future. It also must be observed. Why wouldn’t this translate throughout the system? It’s an interesting field theory and one of the reasons I adore physics. If my math skills were better, I’d have kept with science. But then, I’d not be writing—so of course, because in the future I’m writing, my math skills had to be poor to fulfill that outcome. Hey, it’s a good theory!

Trailokya is many things, including hard to pin to fantasy or science . Fantasy is the safe label, should it be deemed to not contain enough science, but to also cover the ‘creatures’ that populate the narrative, such as the many variations of duta (Sanskrit word for Angel). Since they’re torn straight out of scripture, the idea of science starts to fray apart. But, what if?

The horror genre easily deals with supernatural emanations, disregarding our fallible senses and how we cling to our elementary knowledge of the universe. It poses the ideas that the supernatural is natural, but that a buffer of some kind exists to keep it at the minimum. What if that buffer was the barrier between universes and the things we call supernatural beings are citizens of other worlds? Then, they would be aliens—ultra terrestrials, to be more precise. And, with that, the gap between supernatural and natural is closed. Shelley’s monster is at the house. We must face him.

Trailokya asks you to face the possibility of a much more strange, if not surreal, universe than our sense and current knowledge tell us. It bridges the gap between theology and science.

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About K. Williams

Born in Saratoga Springs, New York,  K.Williams embarked on a now twenty year career in writing. After a childhood, which consisted of voracious reading and hours of film watching, it was a natural progression to study and produce art.

K attended Morrisville State College, majoring in the Biological Sciences, and then continued with English and Historical studies at the University at Albany, home of the New York State ’s Institute, gaining her Bachelor’s Degree. While attending UA, K interned with the 13th Moon Feminist Literary Magazine, bridging her interests in social movements and art. Topics of K’s writing include the environment, animal welfare, gender limitations, racial disparities, and the trauma of war.

Published novels by K include the Civil War drama Blue Honor, the Second World War spy thriller OP-DEC:Operation Deceit, and the controversial science fiction/fantasy series The Trailokya Trilogy. In addition to writing novels, K enjoy’s the art of screenwriting and has worked on the screen spec 8 Days in Ireland, and the adaptations of her current novels. Currently, K has completed the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program for Film Studies and Screenwriting at Empire State College (SUNY), and is the 2013-2014 recipient of the Foner Fellowship in Arts and Social Justice. In 2015, K. Williams became an official member of International Thriller Writers.

K continues to write on this blog weekly, producing commentary Mondays and Fridays on hot topics with some fun diversions for your work week. Whether it’s cooking, learning a foreign language, history or dogs, you’ll find something to enjoy and keep coming back for.  Always a promoter of other artists, K uses Guest Blog Wednesdays to showcase artists from around the web and bring you interesting readings to expand your horizons. A sequel to her second novel, OP-DEC, is in the research phase, while the screen adaptation is being considered for production by film companies.

A devoted dog mom to Miss Sadie Sue Shagbottom, K is also a visual artist, producing the ZoDuck Cartoon, painting and sketching–digitally or traditionally, as well as an accomplished Photographer.

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